Bailouts and the Optimal Size of States

Risk-pooling in an era of frequent financial crisis is not as good an argument against Scottish independence as Tyler Cowen thinks it is. First off, bailing out is a policy choice to which there are alternatives. Second, financial governance matters. Who had a worse financial crisis in 2008: the United States (population 300 million) or … Continue reading Bailouts and the Optimal Size of States

Interposition:Part Five: Assuming Powers from National Bank to Seditious Libel

Not long after the ratification of the Constitution, Madison came to have serious doubts about his former Federalist friends. Particularly, he came to suspect the sincerity of many who had asserted that the new government would possess only those powers specifically delegated to it. The first disappointment came with Hamilton’s championing of the incorporation of … Continue reading Interposition:Part Five: Assuming Powers from National Bank to Seditious Libel

The Fed giveth and the Fed taketh away

Following yesterday's meeting, the Fed's Federal Open Market Committee seems to be relatively optimistic that (1) the recovery is underway (even if employment figures are less than one might hope) and (2) despite rising commodity prices, inflation expectations “remain stable.” As a result, some are predicting that the Fed will not continue quantitative easing past … Continue reading The Fed giveth and the Fed taketh away

Iceland: Letting Die and Living High?

Guido Fawkes makes the case for letting banks fail, comparing the trajectories of two economies massively damaged by the financial crisis: Iceland and Ireland. Iceland let its banks fail, while Ireland has bailed out its banks, to massive expense: The Irish bail-out plan will cost €54,800 per Irish household. Ireland’s future thus looks a lot … Continue reading Iceland: Letting Die and Living High?