I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face

Bad guys (and gals) beware: Dustin Volz (National Journal) reports that the “FBI’s Facial-Recognition Technology Has Achieved ‘Full Operational Capability’”

The agency announced two new services Monday that complete the database’s “operational capability.” The first, called Rap Back, allows officials to receive “ongoing status notifications” regarding the reported criminal history of people “in positions of trust, such as schoolteachers.”

And

The other newly deployed service is the Interstate Photo System, a facial-recognition program that will allow law-enforcement agencies, including probation and parole officers, to cross-reference photographic images with criminal databases.

The Privacy Coalition (over 30 groups, including the ACLU and the Electronic Frontier Foundation) is not pleased. In a letter to Attorney General Eric Holder, it observed:

The facial recognition component of NGI [Next Generation Identification System] poses real threats to privacy for all Americans, and could, in the future, allow us to be monitored and tracked in unprecedented ways. NGI will include criminal and non-criminal photos, and the FBI projects that by 2015, the database could include as many as 52 million face images. 4.3 million of those would be taken for non- criminal purposes, such as employer background checks. It appears FBI plans to include these non-criminal images every time a law enforcement agency performs a criminal search of the database.

Fortunately, the Privacy Coalition does not need to be concerned. As Volz reports:

FBI Director James Comey attempted to dispel fears that the use of biometric data for identification purposes amounted to some sort of Orwellian tracking system. Comey testified before Congress that the database would not collect or store photos of everyday people. Its use, he said, is only intended to “find bad guys by matching pictures to mugshots.”

No federal laws limit the use of facial-recognition software, either by the private sector or the government.

As I concluded the other day when discussing asset forfeiture, “NSA collection of data, militarization of police forces, the wide scale practice of “stop and seize”… One does not have to be a cynic to discern a pattern here.” We can now add the fully operational facial recognition technology to the list.

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